[Image of the Day] Grenada’s Underwater sculptures: A tribute to fallen African slaves

Published on April 5th, 2012

Located in Grenada’s Moilinere Bay, Jason de Caires Taylor’s underwater sculptures are a momument created to pay homage to the hundreds of slaves that sought freedom or were forced to jump overboard slave ships travelling through the Middle Passage from West Africa to the Americas and the Caribbean.

Moiliniere Bay suffered considerable storm damage in recent years and the placement of an artificial structure has provided a new base for marine life to proliferate. The sculptures were also designed to create a diversion from other areas of coral reef currently endangered by over use from water actvities.

 

 

 

 

 

Your Comments

  1. Posted by Ourania on May 4th, 2012, 04:03 [Reply]

    This is amazing and challenging and beautiful with a touch of hurt. I was just wondering for my own realization, what might the significance of 26 be to this underwater wonder?

  2. Posted by dioone cooper on May 31st, 2012, 13:13 [Reply]

    Where can I obtain hard copy photos of all 3.Very emotional!

  3. Posted by lori jackson on June 11th, 2012, 04:51 [Reply]

    Moved to tears..

  4. Posted by linda foote on June 19th, 2012, 14:02 [Reply]

    Amazing sculpture! A tribute to the nameless, courageous souls sunk in the depths, but not forgotten. Silently forming new “bones” as the coral forms, creating new life. Beautiful

  5. Posted by PJ on June 21st, 2012, 13:20 [Reply]

    The first look at the ring makes you feel cold and then filled with wonder and then the thought of just how easily we forgett.

  6. Posted by Robert Munroe on June 30th, 2012, 10:38 [Reply]

    That’s funny. I’ve been following Jason’s work. And as far as I know it has nothing to do with our African Ancestors. The first image you’ve listed was inspired by a female character in a book, (not a slave), the second image is a ring of children, and the final image are the self cast faces of local art students. You should actually go to his site and get the correct information.

  7. Posted by L J Watts on July 8th, 2012, 22:59 [Reply]

    This is extraordinary work. I am fascinated with the magnificent details of the faces.

  8. Posted by Alyce on July 20th, 2012, 00:50 [Reply]

    I went to this sculpture’s site and it spoke of some of these sculptures as being a tribute to the slaves that were either forced to jump overboard or thrown over. After reading one of the above comments stating that they really weren’t, then I like to be told what is correct? Thanks! They are simply breathtaking in any case!

    • Gabstamatic Posted by Gabstamatic on July 20th, 2012, 01:08 [Reply]

      Hi Alyce,

      After similar questions about the initial intent of the sculptures I emailed the artist and received the following reply:

      “It was never my intention to have any connection to the Middle passage, below is the original text. Although it was not my intention from the outset I am very encouraged how it has resonated differently within various communities and feel it is working as an art piece by questioning our identity, history and stimulating debate.”

      – Jason de Caires Taylor

      • Posted by Shanae on September 2nd, 2012, 05:44 [Reply]

        Hello. I was so moved by these sculptures they made me cry. After reading your response to the artist explanation as to his sculptures I needed clarity. I still get choked up reading about african american history. While this artist work has moved me to tears I still am puzzeled as to why place the statues underwater if they were not to deplict african americans thrown overboard. I am not trying to be disrespectful just curious. Thank You.

  9. Posted by anthony gibson on July 23rd, 2012, 14:48 [Reply]

    its very touching

  10. Posted by Marcha on July 31st, 2012, 21:20 [Reply]

    Thank u so much for sharing these most profound and powerful images. Magnificent!

  11. Posted by Jemil Miller on August 10th, 2012, 04:12 [Reply]

    These images gave me goose bumps..I am so choked up. They are breathtaking, and incredibly thought provoking. I teach art and intend for my students to experience them this year. Thank you so much.

  12. Posted by Ernestine B Hemmitt on August 19th, 2012, 05:57 [Reply]

    The images stirred despair for those who perished, it silenced me and made me sit still out of respect. I then was impelled to stay prayerful for our world peace.

  13. Posted by Rita on October 17th, 2012, 01:46 [Reply]

    From the research of the artist’s site, it makes no reference to the middle passage. Regardless it is a wonderful sculpture that creates meaning for me and good for the environment.
    http://www.underwatersculpture.com/

    • Gabstamatic Posted by Gabstamatic on October 17th, 2012, 20:02 [Reply]

      Hi Rita,

      Thanks for commenting on this post. It’s been the cause of much debate around what the true meaning of the sculptures mean. We got in touch with Jason to find out what his intentions were and he gave this reply:

      “It was never my intention to have any connection to the Middle passage, below is the original text. Although it was not my intention from the outset I am very encouraged how it has resonated differently within various communities and feel it is working as an art piece by questioning our identity, history and stimulating debate.”

      – Jason de Caires Taylor

  14. Posted by Darleen Oparanozie on January 31st, 2013, 18:30 [Reply]

    These sculptures are truly amazing. I was shown these by my sister in Jesus Christ. All I could think of was the scripture that speaks of how the sea will give up its dead…It pays to know Jesus as savior and Lord! BELIEVE!!!

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